The Brant Foundation Lecture in Contemporary Art: Dr. Kellie Jones “Women and the Dreamwork”
Mar
6
5:00 PM17:00

The Brant Foundation Lecture in Contemporary Art: Dr. Kellie Jones “Women and the Dreamwork”

  • Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, Bard College (map)
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CCS Bard is proud to present a lecture by Dr. Kellie Jones, one of America’s leading art historians and author of such books as EyeMinded: Living and Writing Contemporary Art (2011), and South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s (2017), which was named a Best Art Book of 2017 in The New York Times, a Best Book of 2017 in Artforum and received the Walter & Lillian Lowenfels Criticism Award from the American Book Award in 2018.

This lecture will be the third in The Brant Foundation Lecture in Contemporary Art series, and will be given on Wednesday, March 6, 2019 at 5pm at Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, Bard College. The talk “Women and the Dreamwork” will consider work by three women artists: Candida Alvarez, Elizabeth Catlett, and Elizabeth Murray, and is made by possible by the major grant given from The Brant Foundation to Bard College to support The Brant Foundation Fellowship in Contemporary Arts.

Dr. Kellie Jones is a Professor in Art History and Archaeology and a Faculty Fellow with the Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS) at Columbia University. Her research interests include African American and African Diaspora artists, Latinx and Latin American Artists, and issues in contemporary art and museum theory.

Dr. Jones has received numerous awards for her work from the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, Harvard University; Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant and a term as Scholar-in-Residence at the Terra Foundation for American Art in Europe in Giverny, France. In 2016 she was named a MacArthur Foundation Fellow.

Dr. Jones’s writings have appeared in a multitude of exhibition catalogues and journals. She is the author of two books published by Duke University Press, EyeMinded: Living and Writing Contemporary Art (2011), and South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s (2017).

Dr. Jones has also worked as a curator for over three decades and has numerous major national and international exhibitions to her credit. Her exhibition Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles, 1960-1980, at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, was named one of the best exhibitions of 2011 and 2012 by Artforum, and best thematic show nationally by the International Association of Art Critics (AICA). She was co-curator of Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the 1960s (Brooklyn Museum), named one the best exhibitions of 2014 by Artforum.

About The Brant Foundation

The Brant Foundation, Inc.’s mission is to promote education and appreciation of contemporary art and design by making works available to institutions and individuals for scholarly study, examination, and loan. Currently, The Brant Foundation, established in 1996, lends works to more than a dozen exhibitions per year. The Brant Foundation Art Study Center, designed by Richard Gluckman and located in Greenwich, CT, opened its doors in 2009 and presents long-term exhibitions curated primarily from the collection. The collection is remarkable in that scores of artists are represented in depth, including works from the earliest period of their practice through their most recent works. Additional information may be found on the Foundation’s website, www.brantfoundation.org.

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Art & Politics: Soul of a Nation Symposium
Mar
23
10:00 AM10:00

Art & Politics: Soul of a Nation Symposium

On Soul of a Nation's opening day, The Broad will present a day of enriching conversations, artist talks and poetry, organized by UC Irvine professors Bridget R. Cooks (associate professor, Department of African American Studies and Art History, UC Irvine) and Frank B. Wilderson III (professor and chair of African American Studies, UC Irvine). The event will include compelling conversations between artists featured in the exhibition, such as artists Jae and Wadsworth Jarrell and Gerald Williams with Vida L. Brown (visual arts curator, California African American Museum), among others, as well as renowned art historians and curators like Thelma Golden (director and chief curator, The Studio Museum), Phyllis J. Jackson (associate professor, art history, Pomona College), Kellie Jones (professor, art history and archaeology and the Institute for Research in African American Studies, Columbia University), and Naima J. Keith (deputy director and chief curator, California African American Museum). 

A reading will be given by distinguished poet Kamau Daáood, author of The Language of Saxophones: Selected Poems of Kamau Daáood and the critically acclaimed album, Leimert ParkDarren Walker, president of the Ford Foundation, will speak in conversation with Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Ava DuVernay.

Tickets ($20; $15 student) include one-time, anytime access to Soul of A Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983 and are available here.

SCHEDULE:

10:05-10:30AM

Introductory Remarks

  • 10:05-10:10AM- Welcome, Joanne Heyler, Founding Director, The Broad

  • 10:10-10:20AM- Mark Godfrey and Zoe Whitley, Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983 Organizing Curators

  • 10:20-10:30AM- Bridget R. Cooks and Frank B. Wilderson III: Introduction to the Symposium

10:35AM-11:50AM (1 hour conversation / 15 min Q&A)

Panel 1: The Politics of Black Exhibitions

  • Thelma Golden, Director and Chief Curator, The Studio Museum in Harlem

  • Kellie Jones, Professor, Art and Archaeology and the Institute for Research in African American Studies, Columbia University

  • Naima J. Keith, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, California African American Museum

  • Facilitator: Bridget R. Cooks, Associate Professor, African American Studies and Art History, UC Irvine

11:55AM-12:40PM

Panel 2: AfriCOBRA Artists

  • Soul of a Nation artists Jae Jarrell, Wadsworth Jarrell, and Gerald Williams 

  • Vida L. Brown, Visual Arts Curator, California African American Museum

12:40-2:10PM

Lunch

2:10-3:00PM

Conversation

  • Darren Walker, President, Ford Foundation

  • Ava DuVernay, Director and Filmmaker

3:05-3:50PM

Conversation

  • Mel Edwards, Soul of a Nation artist

  • Dale Davis, Artist and Co-Founder, Brockman Gallery

3:55-4:55PM (45 min conversation / 15 min Q&A)

Panel 3: Black Power and Politics

  • Frank B. Wilderson III, Professor and Chair of African American Studies, UC Irvine

  • Phyllis J. Jackson, Professor, Art History, Pomona College

5:00-5:20PM

Poetry Reading

  • Kamau Daáood, Performance poet, artist, and community activist

5:25-5:30PM

Closing Remarks

  • Bridget R. Cooks and Frank B. Wilderson III

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Feb
17
1:00 PM13:00

Discussion: A Tribute to Charles White

  • Los Angeles County Museum of Art - Bing Theater (map)
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To honor the legacy of Charles White, scholars, students, and those closest to him will discuss this artist's groundbreaking achievements as artist, teacher, and mentor. Moving to Southern California in the mid-1950s, Charles White was not only a major participant in the art scene, but was fully involved in politics as well as filmmaking and music. Among his many friends were Harry Belafonte, Sidney Poitier, and Dalton Trumbo; among his students at Otis Art Institute (now Otis College of Art + Design) were Kerry James Marshall, Kent Twitchell, Judithe Hernández, David Hammons, and a veritable who's who of other outstanding artists. Above all though, his influence lives on in his exquisite drawings and prints, paintings, and other works that are featured in Charles White: A Retrospective.

Speakers include Ilene Susan Fort, the museum's curator emeritus of American art and curator of the Los Angeles venue of the exhibition; Ian White, son of Charles White, an artist in his own right and archivist of his father's work; Judithe Hernández, renown contemporary artist and one of Charles White's students; Kellie Jones, Associate Professor of Art History and Archaeology in African American Studies at Columbia University; and Peter Clothier, noted writer and art critic.

The event is free, but tickets are required. Tickets are available here.

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Feb
8
10:30 AM10:30

John Wilmerding Symposium on American Art: Artists and American Communities, Then and Now

  • National Gallery of Art - East Building Auditorium (map)
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Dialogues with artists and scholars held in conjunction with Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950. Conversations will explore some of the inspiring cooperative relationships between artists and American communities. Presentation topics will range from the history of government support for artists and community centers during the 1930s and 1940s, to the impact of community programs on Parks’s development as a photographer, to examples of how artists are working today. The exhibition, which will be open through February 18, revisits the meteoric development of Parks as a photographer, his social documentary, industrial, fashion, and film work, and the meaning of this work in picturing and representing the African diaspora.

Registration is free but required; register here. Seating is available on a first-come, first seated basis.

The symposium will be streamed live here.

10:30–10:35
Introduction
Sarah Greenough, senior curator and head, department of photographs,
National Gallery of Art

10:35–11:20
Keynote Address: Boarding the Voyage
Robin Coste Lewis, Poet Laureate of Los Angeles and Provost’s Fellow in Poetry and Visual Studies, University of Southern California

11:20–11:30 BREAK

11:30–12:30
Artists and Communities: Then
Melanee C. Harvey, assistant professor, department of art, Howard University

Kellie Jones, professor, department of art history and archaeology, and faculty fellow, Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS), Columbia University

Richard J. Powell, John Spencer Bassett Professor of Art and Art History, Duke University, and Edmond J. Safra Visiting Professor, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art

Laura Wexler, professor of American studies, women’s, gender, and sexuality studies, and film and media studies, affiliate faculty in ethnicity, race, and migration, cochair, public humanities program, director, The Photographic Memory Workshop, and primary investigator, The Photogrammar Project, Yale University

12:30–1:00
Discussion
Moderated by Anjuli J. Lebowitz, exhibition research associate, department of photographs, National Gallery of Art

1:00–2:30 BREAK
 
2:30–3:30
Artists and Communities: Now
Devin Allen, artist and 2017 fellow, The Gordon Parks Foundation

Eric Gottesman, artist and cofounder, For Freedoms, and assistant professor of photography, Purchase College, State University of New York

Rick Lowe, artist, founder, Project Row Houses, and clinical associate professor of art, University of Houston

Maséqua Myers, executive director, South Side Community Art Center

3:30–3:40 BREAK

3:40
Discussion
Moderated by Philip Brookman, consulting curator, department of photographs,
National Gallery of Art

Made possible by a grant from the Walton Family Foundation.

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Entangled Spirits: A Conversation Series on the Arts, Religion & Politics Featuring Mickalene Thomas and Darnell Moore in Conversation
Feb
6
6:15 PM18:15

Entangled Spirits: A Conversation Series on the Arts, Religion & Politics Featuring Mickalene Thomas and Darnell Moore in Conversation

Entangled Spirits brings together scholars, activists, artists and practitioners (in a variety of fields) for a series of public conversations; each of which will grapple with a tangled knot of questions and concerns that emerge from the intersection of the arts, religion, and politics.

This first Entangled Spirits event features a dialogue between the artist Mickalene Thomas and writer/ activist Darnell Moore, moderated by Columbia Professor Kellie Jones, with a brief introduction by the series' organizer, Professor Josef Sorett.

RSVP at http://heymancenter.org/events/mickalena-thomas-and-darnell-moore/

Registration is required, and will close on February 4th, 2019. Free and open to the public. First come, first seated.

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BROOKLYN TALKS: Hank Willis Thomas
Jan
10
7:00 PM19:00

BROOKLYN TALKS: Hank Willis Thomas

  • Brooklyn Museum, 3rd Floor - Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium (map)
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Dr. Kellie Jones, award-winning art historian, author, and curator, talks with artist Hank Willis Thomas about his new book, All Things Being Equal (Aperture 2018), which surveys Thomas's prolific and extraordinary interdisciplinary career. In the ten years since his first publication, Pitch Blackness (Aperture 2008), Thomas has become known for his ability to critically dissect the flow of images in American visual culture, especially with attention to race, gender, and cultural identity. Presented in partnership with Aperture and in connection with our exhibition Something to Say: Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine, Deborah Kass, Kameelah Janan Rasheed, and Hank Willis Thomas.

Tickets are $16 and include Museum admission. Member tickets are $14. Not a Member? Join today!

To request accommodations such as assistive listening devices, American Sign Language interpretation, and open captioning, email Brooklyn Museum at access@brooklynmuseum.org.

Image Credit: Hank Willis Thomas (American, born 1976). Counterbalance, 2015; from the series Punctum. Fiberglass with chameleon auto paint finish. (Photo: From Hank Willis Thomas: All Things Being Equal(Aperture/Portland Art Museum, 2018). © Hank Willis Thomas)

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2017-2018 BENJAMIN WEST LECTURE - Women and the Dreamwork
Nov
15
4:30 PM16:30

2017-2018 BENJAMIN WEST LECTURE - Women and the Dreamwork

The Benjamin West Lecture, made possible by gifts from members of the Class of 1905 and other friends of the College, is given annually on some phase of art.  It is the outgrowth of the Benjamin West Society, which built up a collection of paintings, drawings, and prints, which are exhibited, as space permits, in the buildings on campus.  The lecture was named for the American artist who was born in a house that stands on the campus and became president of the Royal Academy.

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The Visiting Artist & Scholar Series (Supported by Vista Foundation) - Lecture & Book Signing
Sep
25
6:00 PM18:00

The Visiting Artist & Scholar Series (Supported by Vista Foundation) - Lecture & Book Signing

  • University of Cincinnati College of Design, Architecture, Art & Planning - DAAP 5401 (map)
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This presentation revolves around Jones’s book South of Pico in which she explores how the artists in Los Angeles’s black communities during the 1960s and 1970s created a vibrant, productive, and engaged activist arts scene in the face of structural racism. Emphasizing the importance of African American migration, as well as L.A.’s housing and employment politics, Jones shows how the work of black Angeleno artists such as Betye Saar, Charles White, Noah Purifoy, and Senga Nengudi spoke to the dislocation of migration, L.A.’s urban renewal, and restrictions on black mobility. Jones characterizes their works as modern migration narratives that look to the past to consider real and imagined futures. She also attends to these artists’ relationships with gallery and museum culture and the establishment of black-owned arts spaces. With South of Pico, Jones expands the understanding of the histories of black arts and creativity in Los Angeles and beyond.

Dr. Kellie Jones is a Professor in Art History and Archaeology and a Faculty Fellow with the Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS) at Columbia University. Her research interests include African American and African Diaspora artists, Latinx and Latin American Artists, and issues in contemporary art and museum theory.

The Vista Foundation supports both the pursuit of the study of art history and the School of Art at DAAP. The Foundation’s annual lecture is held each Fall and brings notable artists, art writers, art curators, and art historians to DAAP.

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MetFridays - "Reflections on Jack Whitten"
Sep
21
6:30 PM18:30

MetFridays - "Reflections on Jack Whitten"

  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art-Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium (map)
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Dr. Jones will join Kelly Baum - Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon Polsky Curator of Contemporary Art at The Met - and renowned artists Melvin Edwards, Martin Puryear, and William T. Williams to reflect on the life and work of Jack Whitten. 

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Odyssey: Jack Whitten Sculpture, 1963–2017

 

Image Credit: Jack Whitten (American, 1939–2018). The Tomb of Socrates (detail), 2009. Wild cypress, black mulberry, marble, brass, mixed media, 26 x 20 1/2 x 8 1/4 in. (66 x 52 x 21 cm). Collection of the Artist's Estate © The Estate of Jack Whitten. Courtesy The Estate of Jack Whitten and Hauser & Wirth

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In Conversation: MacArthur Fellows
Sep
18
6:00 PM18:00

In Conversation: MacArthur Fellows

  • Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life-NYU, Grand Hall-5th Floor (map)
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Icons in the fields of art history, documentary filmmaking and journalism discuss and explore their visionary work and its intersections with art making, social justice, and history. Addressing current issues of the past and today New York Times investigative reporter, Nikole Hannah-Jones will discuss how her voice is reshaping conversations on education; Columbia University art history professor Kellie Jones, PhD, will present on artist “Charles White, Feminist at Mid-Century,” and Louis Massiah, founder and director of Scribe Video, will discuss the role of video as an artistic tool for change and self-determination in his talk “The Documentary of Utility - A Creative Practice.”

Please RSVP: nyuiaaa-cbvc-events@nyu.edu or (212) 998-IAAA(4222)

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ART & EQUITY A dialogue between Toyin Ojih Odutola and Mary Sibande, moderated by Kellie Jones
Jan
31
6:00 PM18:00

ART & EQUITY A dialogue between Toyin Ojih Odutola and Mary Sibande, moderated by Kellie Jones

A dialogue between Toyin Ojih Odutola, Barnard’s Lida A. Orzeck ’68 Artist-in-Residence, and Mary Sibande, Johannesburg and Venice Biennale artist, moderated by Kellie Jones, Columbia Professor of Art History and MacArthur Fellow. As one of the inaugural events of the Atlantic Fellows for Racial Equity (AFRE), two powerful contemporary artists discuss issues of esthetics, gender, race, and justice.  What political role can artists play today?

Both Ojih Odutola and Sibande have created beautiful and original images of the human body.  By defying stereotypes, their work opens new visions of who we are and could be.  Toyin Ojih Odutola (Ife, Nigeria 1985-) was raised in California and Alabama, earned her MFA from California College of the Arts in San Francisco and now works in New York City.  She currently has a show at the Whitney Museum of American Art, To Wander Determined. Mary Sibande (South Africa 1982-) lives and works in Johannesburg. She obtained her Diploma in Fine Arts at the Witwatersrand Technikon (2004) and a B-Tech degree from the University of Johannesburg (2007). Her works have been shown in South Africa, New York, and London.

This event is jointly sponsored by the Orzeck Artist in Residency, the Atlantic Fellows for Racial Equity (AFRE), the Columbia Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS) and the Barnard Art History department.

Information: arthistory@barnard.edu

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Kellie Jones and Hettie Jones: In Conversation
Nov
30
6:00 PM18:00

Kellie Jones and Hettie Jones: In Conversation

Join us on Thursday, November 30 at 6pm for an extraordinary conversation between mother and daughter - and celebrated authors and scholars - Dr. Kellie Jones and Hettie Jones discussing life and their books South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s, EyeMinded: Living and Writing Contemporary Art, How I Became Hettie Jones, and Love, H: The Letters of Helene Dorn and Hettie Jones.

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Lecture & Book Signing - South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the '60s AND '70s
Oct
26
5:30 PM17:30

Lecture & Book Signing - South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the '60s AND '70s

  • Art, Design & Architecture Museum - UC Santa Barbara (map)
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Professor Kellie Jones, Associate Professor in the Department of Art History and Archaeology and the Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS) at Columbia University, will be presenting a lecture based on her new book, South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s. Her research interests include African Diaspora and African American artists, Latin American and Latino/a artists, and problems in contemporary art and museum theory.  The event will be followed by a book signing.

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CONVERSATIONS - Kellie Jones: South of Pico
Oct
25
7:30 PM19:30

CONVERSATIONS - Kellie Jones: South of Pico

In South of Pico, MacArthur winner and Columbia University professor Kellie Jones explores how the artists in Los Angeles’s black communities during the 1960s and 1970s created a vibrant, engaged activist arts scene in the face of racism and social upheaval. Building on her work on the Hammer exhibition Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles, 1960–1980, Jones expands our understanding of the history of black arts in Los Angeles and beyond. She is joined by UCLA professor Robin D. G. Kelley.

Coffee, tea, and book signing to follow.

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UCI Illuminations - South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s
Oct
24
4:00 PM16:00

UCI Illuminations - South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s

  • University of California Irvine African American Studies (map)
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Lecture by Dr. Kellie Jones, Associate Professor of Art History at Columbia University, and MacArthur Genius Fellow. Dr. Jones will read from and discuss her book South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s. She will delineate how the artists in Los Angeles's black communities during the 1960s and 1970s created a vibrant, productive, and engaged activist arts scene in the face of structural racism. Integrating histories of African American migration, as well as L.A.'s housing and employment politics, Dr. Jones describes the work of black Angelino artists such as Betye Saar, Charles White, Noah Purifoy, and Senga Nengudi in order to discuss the dislocation of migration, L.A.'s urban renewal, and restrictions on black mobility. Dr. Jones characterizes their works as modern migration narratives that look to the past to consider real and imagined futures. With this lecture drawing from South of Pico, Dr. Jones delves into the histories of black arts and creativity in Los Angeles and beyond.

After the lecture, Dr. Jones will have a question and answer period, as well as a reception.

Co-Sponsors:
Department of African American Studies and the Department of Film and Media Studies

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Author Talk + Book Signing: Kellie Jones: South of Pico
Oct
23
7:00 PM19:00

Author Talk + Book Signing: Kellie Jones: South of Pico

  • 4334 Degnan Boulevard Los Angeles, CA, 90008 United States (map)
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The California African American Museum (CAAM) and Art + Practice (A+P) are pleased to host esteemed author, curator, and Associate Professor in Art History and Archaeology and African American Studies at Columbia University Kellie Jones, who will discuss and sign her new book South of Pico.

In South of Pico Kellie Jones explores how artists during the 1960s and 1970s in Los Angeles's black communities created a vibrant, productive, and engaged activist arts scene in the face of structural racism. Emphasizing the importance of African American migration, as well as Los Angeles's housing and employment politics, Jones shows how the work of black Angeleno artists such as Betye Saar, Charles White, Noah Purifoy, and Senga Nengudi spoke to the dislocation of migration, Los Angeles's urban renewal, and restrictions on black mobility. Jones characterizes their works as modern migration narratives that look to the past to consider real and imagined futures. She also attends to these artists' relationships with gallery and museum culture as well as the establishment of black-owned arts spaces. With South of Pico, Jones expands the understanding of the histories of black arts and creativity in Los Angeles and beyond.

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Black Art, Black Power: Responses to Soul of a Nation
Oct
13
10:30 AM10:30

Black Art, Black Power: Responses to Soul of a Nation

This day-long conference brings together acclaimed contributors from the UK and USA for a series of unique presentations and rich panel discussions that explore the art, artists and social histories featured in the exhibition Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power. Topics of discussion include the role of key cities such as Chicago, Los Angeles and New York in the development of American art in the 1960s and 70s, the influence of American art on British artists in the 1980s and beyond, and contemporary artistic responses to new forms of social and political change.

Contributors include: Sampada Aranke (San Francisco Art Institute), Celeste-Marie Bernier (University of Edinburgh), Dawoud Bey (artist), Margo Natalie Crawford (Cornell University), Elvira Dyangani Ose (Creative Time and Goldsmiths, University of London), Tuliza Fleming (National Museum of African American History and Culture), Mark Godfrey (Senior Curator, International Art, Tate), Lubaina Himid (artist; University of Central Lancashire), Kellie Jones (Columbia University), Uri McMillan (University of California, Los Angeles), Marlene Smith (artist; Chelsea College of Arts), Zoe Whitley (Curator, International Art, Tate), and Deborah Willis (artist; New York University).

 

This event has been provided by Tate Gallery on behalf of Tate Enterprises LT

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Art Talk: An Evening with Kellie Jones
Sep
28
6:00 PM18:00

Art Talk: An Evening with Kellie Jones

  • Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art (map)
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5pm | Gallery Viewing and Public Reception
6pm | Lecture

Kellie Jones, MacArthur Fellow and professor of art history at Columbia University, has been rewriting the history of art to include artists traditionally excluded. Join a discussion of her research and curatorial work about contemporary African-American and African Diaspora artists and racial justice.

Free admission. Presented in partnership with The Amistad Center for Art & Culture.

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Complex Issues: SOUTH OF PICO: AFRICAN AMERICAN ARTISTS IN LOS ANGELES IN THE 1960S AND 1970s
Sep
26
6:30 PM18:30

Complex Issues: SOUTH OF PICO: AFRICAN AMERICAN ARTISTS IN LOS ANGELES IN THE 1960S AND 1970s

Complex Issues explores difference, visibility, and representation through recent work by faculty of Columbia University and Columbia University School of the Arts in particular. Conversations invite challenging questions of racial, ethnic, gender, economic, sexual, religious, and cultural complexity, and how they are articulated across discipline and genre today. This event is preceded by a special opportunity to view Living in America: Frank Lloyd Wright, Harlem & Modern Housing, Wallach Art Gallery, 5:30-6:30pm. Co-presented by the Department of Art History and Archaeology; the Center for Jazz Studies; the Institute for Research in African-American Studies; and The Miriam & Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery.

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Points of View Speaker Series: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s with Dr. Kellie Jones
Sep
23
2:00 PM14:00

Points of View Speaker Series: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s with Dr. Kellie Jones

  • Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts - Historic Landmark Building (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In her 2017 book South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s, Dr. Kellie Jones explores how the artists in Los Angeles's black communities created a vibrant, productive, and engaged activist arts scene in the face of structural racism. Emphasizing the importance of African American migration, as well as L.A.'s housing and employment politics, Jones shows how the work of black Angeleno artists such as Betye Saar, Charles White, Noah Purifoy, and Senga Nengudi spoke to the dislocation of migration, L.A.'s urban renewal, and restrictions on black mobility.

Dr. Jones, a 2016 recipient of a MacArthur "Genius Grant," is Associate Professor of Art History at Columbia University, the author of several books and has curated numerous national and international exhibitions, including Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles, 1960–1980 and Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties.

This program is held in conjunction with the exhibition A Collaborative Language: Selections from the Experimental Printmaking Institute.

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Conversation: Kellie Jones with Romi Crawford
Sep
7
6:00 PM18:00

Conversation: Kellie Jones with Romi Crawford

Columbia University professor Kellie Jones, an art historian, curator, and 2016 MacArthur Fellow, speaks about her new book, South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s, and current projects, with School of the Art Institute of Chicago professor Romi Crawford.

Presented with emerge: journal of arts administration and policy, MA Department Arts Administration and Policy at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

*Museum admission is free for Illinois residents every Thursday, 5:00–8:00—including during this event.

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A Conversation with Guthrie P. Ramsey, Jr. - CUNY Intellectual Publics Series
May
15
6:30 PM18:30

A Conversation with Guthrie P. Ramsey, Jr. - CUNY Intellectual Publics Series

As part of the Intellectual Publics series hosted by CUNY, Dr. Jones sits down with professor, author and musician Guthrie P. Ramsey, Jr.

Ramsey is the Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor of Music and Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and Editor in Chief of Musiqology, a website dedicated to making musicology - the scientific study of music - attractive, fun and accessible to audiences around the world.

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Studio Salon
Apr
27
6:30 PM18:30

Studio Salon

Join us for this special edition of Studio Salon as we celebrate the launch of Dr. Kellie Jones's book, South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s, an exploration of the vibrant arts scene in Southern California in the face of the tumultuous political environment of those decades. The evening's program will feature Dr. Kellie Jones in conversation with 2014–15 artist in residence Sadie Barnette, and Ashley James, MoMA Research Consortium Fellow in the department of Drawings and Prints, as they employ both the book and Excerpt in discussing migration, mobility and the future of black-owned contemporary art spaces. After the conversation join us for a reception and pick up a signed copy of Dr. Jones's book from the Museum Store!

This program is free with Museum admission, which is a suggested donation of $7 for adults and $3 for students and seniors. All seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

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We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–85
Apr
26
6:00 PM18:00

We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–85

  • Columbia University’s Faculty House (map)
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IRAAS presents a panel discussion on the exhibition "We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965-85" [on view at the Brooklyn Museum April 21- September 17, 2017] which focuses on black women artists, examining the political, social, cultural and aesthetic priorities of women of color during the emergence of second-wave feminism.
 
Panelists: Co-Curators - Rujeko Hockley (CC’05) and Catherine Morris; Contemporary Artists - Simone Leigh and Jordan CasteelModerated by Prof. Kellie Jons, Art History & Archaeology; Faculty Fellow, IRAAS- Columbia University

Photo Credit: “Jan van Raay (American, born 1942). Faith Ringgold (right) and Michele Wallace (middle) at Art Workers Coalition Protest, Whitney Museum, 1971. Courtesy of Jan van Raay, Portland, OR, 305-37. © Jan van Raay”

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The 28th James A. Porter Colloquium
Apr
7
to Apr 8

The 28th James A. Porter Colloquium

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In honor of Howard University’s Sesquicentennial Celebration, the 28th Annual James A. Porter Colloquium will turn to examine archival legacies of the African Diaspora. As home to Moorland-Spingarn Research Center and the historic Howard University Art Collection, Howard University’s art community is eager to facilitate a dialog concerning notions of African American or African Diasporic archival aesthetics that connects generations through photographic practice and the life the archival object.

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Black Voices, Black Art: Upending Convention with Kellie Jones and Kimberly Drew
Feb
7
7:00 PM19:00

Black Voices, Black Art: Upending Convention with Kellie Jones and Kimberly Drew

Art historian, curator, and 2016 MacArthur Genius Award-winner Kellie Jones, has both rewritten and rectified the narrative of American art history by shepherding dozens of overlooked black artists into a canon that was narrowly white. With her single-minded focus on contemporary art of the African Diaspora, Jones has literally curated change. She discusses her career, activism, and vision for the future with trailblazing social media maven and blogger Kimberly Drew, a.k.a. @museummammy

Tickets available here.

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